Caribbean foods you must try...

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Most travelers visit the Caribbean for the fairly obvious- the wide expansive beaches, the warm sunlight, the fruity cocktails (these are all perfect reasons). 

But the best part of all is the food! Any trip is the perfect opportunity to temporarily do-away with your diet and explores a new culture through your taste buds. The Caribbean is absolutely no exception. With tasty infusions of local herbs and spices, Caribbean food is typically both flavorful and usually very hearty.

But the best part of all is the food! Any trip is the perfect opportunity to temporarily do-away with your diet and explores a new culture through your taste buds. The Caribbean is absolutely no exception. With tasty infusions of local herbs and spices, Caribbean food is typically both flavorful and usually very hearty.

Here are some foods you must try in some of the EC islands

Oil down in Grenada

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A trip to Grenada is incomplete if you don’t try their national dish, oil down. Oil down is a delicious cook up of breadfruit, callaloo, seasoned chicken, bananas, salted pig’s tail and pig’s snout, pimento peppers, turmeric, and coconut milk. (Sorry vegans). Sometimes yams, okra, green beans or scallions are added, sometimes fish or crabs. Some people even add lambie (Grenadian conch) to the pot. This dish is typically served at beach cook ups where locals gather with to share drinks and have a deep conversation in true Grenadian spirit.

“Roast pork/chicken” in St. Vincent

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This relatively recent addition to Vincentian social gatherings is a fully carnal meal of seasoned meat that is smoked (roasted) on a high heat grill barbeque style then chopped into bite sized cubes that all but melt in your mouth. It is typically served by itself with the option of a light semi-sweet sauce that creates a wonderful dance of flavor on the palate. Roasted food can be found at almost any social event in St. Vincent and has become a definite staple and must try.

“Doubles” in Trinidad

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If you are in Trinidad, you must try “doubles”. This vegetarian-friendly street food is made of two deep fried pieces of flatbread or "barra" filled with curried channa or chickpeas topped with shadon beni, cucumber, coconut garlic, onion, mango or tamarind chutney and pepper sauce. It is a hearty combination of savory and sweet and one of the most popular local delicacies. If you’re afraid of pepper to make sure you don’t ask to have it included. If you think you have a high tolerance for pepper, please ask for “slight” (it’s a local phrase meaning that you do not want it heavy-handed) and work your way up to “heavy pepper” (for pepper veterans.)

Macaroni pie in Barbados

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Barbados, the land of flying fish has a plethora of dishes that you should definitely try, but for us, their local macaroni pie is something special. We cannot give you the recipe because we have no idea what they did. It is definitely the Barbadian version of a traditional mac and cheese bake (typing while drooling) that is really something that goes beyond the realm of a classic mac and cheese. It is creamy, flavorful and yet manages to be light on the palate. If you’re visiting Barbados, definitely get a slice of pie with your rice and peas and flying fish- it’s worth it.

Fungi (Foon-ji) and salted fish- Antigua

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Move over full English breakfast! Fungi is a cooked cornmeal paste (similar in nature to polenta) that is usually paired with a side of mashed seasoned vegetables and salted cod-fish. It is a traditional Antiguan breakfast dish that is both delicious, filling and a must try on your trip.

Red peas soup- British Virgin Islands

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Soups in the Caribbean are definitely not an appetizer. This particular soup is a cook-up of red kidney beans, local herb seasonings, provision, dumplings and meat combined to make a thick, creamy and flavorful stew that is a local favorite.

Creole baguettes- St. Lucia

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Now St. Lucia definitely has a whole lot of foods, but the locally made baguette is too good not to try. Ms. Theresa’s Bakery is a local enterprise that has been responsible for this delicacy for over 60 years. Baked in a large brick oven, the bread is moist yet crisp, ever so slightly sweet, and can quite satisfactorily be eaten by itself or is commonly paired with sharp slices of cheddar cheese which makes for the most delightfully satisfying sandwich. Trust us, after you smell that freshly baked bread, you’d need very little convincing.